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Fine Art Prints

All fine art prints are not created equally. At Slone Art we take pride in knowing that our fine art prints are made of the very best materials and that we can offer our collectors a fine art print that is not only beautiful but also of the highest possible quality.
All our fine art prints are signed and numbered by Slone and are accompanied with authenticity documentation. He will not release a print if he’s not completely satisfied with the quality of the print. Having Slone personally check each print before signing it, ensures that it meets his standards for accuracy and color matching.  When his signature is on it, it means it's acheived his standards and he’s proud to call it his own.

After years of research and trial and error, we found that the best fine art prints are created using the Giclee process. Giclee, uses a specialized printer to deliver a fine stream of ink onto archival paper or canvas. It results in museum-quality art of incredibly vivid color, depth, and resolution that captures the essence of the artist's intent.

All our fine art prints are signed and numbered by Slone and are accompanied with authenticity documentation. He will not release a print if he’s not completely satisfied with the quality of the print. Having Slone personally check each print before signing it, ensures that it meets his standards for accuracy and color matching.  When his signature is on it, it means he’s proud to call it his own.

Most times the process of Fine art printing can be repeated numerous times, creating a limited edition. Slone's editions are usually small, often totalling less than 100 peices in the edition, making them more valuable to collectors. We make it a point to not saturate the market. Sometimes a fine art print is retouched or added to afterwards, making it unique or one-of-a-kind, we refer to these special prints as 'embellished'.

What is an edition?

When all the prints created are identical, this is called an 'Edition'. The artist generally limits the edition to a certain number of his choice. He then hand signs, dates and indicates the number of each individual piece and the total number of copies in the edition, for example, Richard T. Slone '09 5/100. Each peice from the edition is accompanied with authenticity documents.

Categories:

Bon à tirer/Master Print

Every edition has what is called the Bon à tirer (the best of the edition) also known as the Master print. There is only one of these, the model of perfection. Next to the original this print is often the most valuable and sought after peice of the edition.

Hors de Comerce (H/C)

Occasionally you can come across prints marked with H/C. This stands for Hors de Comerce, or “Not for Sale”. These are prints made extra to the edition and the artist’s proofs that the artist intended to give away as presents or simply not for sale. Given the fact that there are very few of these, over time and especially if the artist's popularity continues to grow, the Hors de Comerce prints have a higher commercial and collectors value than those within the numbered edition.

The artist’s proofs

While the artist is the creator, it is not uncommon for the actual printing to be done by an expert printmaker. However, the first few prints are made at least in the presence of the artist who can then make any necessary modifications or changes to create accurate colors and so forth. These prints are called the artist’s proofs. Each one is considered a unique and one-of-a-kind artwork and has a higher commercial value than the rest of the edition. Generally they make up between 5% and 10% of the total edition number. Therefore the edition may be 100 and there are 10 artists proofs totalling 110 images all together. The proofs are marked with A.P, for example: 2/5 A.P. (second of the 5 total proofs).

Limited Edition

When the artist is satisfied with the proofs. The edition is created. The 'Edition' is generally limited to a certain number selected by the artist. Slone rarely makes his edition's larger than 100 peices. He then indicates in pencil or paint (usually in the bottom corner) the number of each individual piece and the total number of copies in the edition, for example, 5/100.

Valuing fine art prints

Although we take advantage of digital printmaking which has the best ability to capture and accuratly recreate Slone's artwork. Years ago, prints were often made using a 'plate'. Those plates deteriorated slightly each time they were used, ceause of this, a print marked 1/40 is usually more valuable and was better quality than one marked 39/40. This tradition is not true of the giclee process of printing - with the help of modern technology we ensure all of our prints are perfect, without deteriation. However lower numbers in the edition are still most sought after. In valuing fine art prints, you should also take into consideration the total number of the edition. A smaller edition number is always more valuable than a larger one, as there are less pieces circulating and in existence. It is mostly up to the artist how many pieces he will print for any one edition.

 

For more information regarding Slone's fine art prints, visit our resouces area or contact us at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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STATUS NOTICE

Additional updates will continue to be added in the coming weeks. Including the 'In Studio with Slone' section, lots of never seen before artwork and tons of news articles will be added. Please be sure to check back with us. Don't forget to register with us (see login at the top of page) to join our mailing list and be entered to win some great artwork, first looks at new editions and special behind the scenes stuff.

Got questions? We have the answer.  info@sloneart.com

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